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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone here know if the fork cap threading has stayed the same since 2016? I've been looking for fork preload caps and there are many options but none for the 2021 model. Most of them are listed for 2016-2018 models. The caps are pretty cheap, but I don't want to order something from China just to return them.

I also have an appointment with a local suspension specialist. He is going to change the fork springs to 90 Nm/mm Öhlins springs and do some modifications to the stock damping rod. He told me that he had some experience with modding the stock rod to better the damping and he even preferred doing the mod for me over cartridge kit for street riding. Going to interesting to feel the difference! The stock fork is just way too undersprung and underdamped for me (230lb). I'll see how it feels and maybe next year it's the rear shock that gets replaced.
 

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By way of coincidence, I am in the process of having K-Tech cartridges installed to my 2022 XSR which isn't going to plan! As a result I have been looking at parts diagrams of a 2017 model and 2022 model's forks. So my problems have helped you since item #17 Bolt Cap is the same part number on 2017 and 2022 bikes.

Rectangle Font Slope Parallel Pattern



Rectangle Font Line Slope Parallel
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for info! This would suggest that the threading has remained the same if the part is interchangeable between different model years. Where did you find the part diagrams? Would like to take a look myself.

Any recommendations for preload caps? I'm a bit wary of generic Chinese bike parts, even if they are very basic in construction. Some cheap preload caps seem to unwind the preload during a ride. I would prefer not to have that experience.
 

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I can't recommend any pre-load caps since I have cartridges which have their own top. As for parts:

When you scroll down you'll see a button to click on for the parts which opens another page for T&C and system requirements which you have to agree to...
...after that "Motorcycles" and put in the details of the bike.
 

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@Entropy What kind of problems are you having with the cartridge kit?

@Errand5347 I just bought the YSS "fork upgrade kit". It comes with springs, spacers, cartridge emulators and preload adjusters.
It's supposed to fit any MT07 from '14-'22. Since the XSR700 and MT07 share the same fork, I figured it should fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@Entropy What kind of problems are you having with the cartridge kit?

@Errand5347 I just bought the YSS "fork upgrade kit". It comes with springs, spacers, cartridge emulators and preload adjusters.
It's supposed to fit any MT07 from '14-'22. Since the XSR700 and MT07 share the same fork, I figured it should fit.
Yeah thanks for the tip, but I already have the springs so I won't be ordering another kit!

Guess I'll ask the suspension specialist for opinion or just try my luck with Ebay. Just buy from a seller that has a clear return policy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the tip @gnarlydog

I just got my bike back from the shop with stiffer spring and more damping. The front is still not stiff by any means, but the difference is noticeable. I didn't get the chance to go on twisties since it's completely dark and 2 degrees (celsius) outside so the ride was just a short (30km) transition on highway and city speeds back to home. It is also important to remember the cold temperature makes a difference compared to usual riding temperatures during summer. Rear preload is set to 8 and seems to be well in balance with the front now.

Front end diving during normal driving is no longer noticeable. My most hated sympton of the soft front end was that when you changed from 1st to 2nd in slow speeds then front end dove. And braking was also annoying, bike seemed to be in almost constant see-saw-motion. Now that behaviour seems to be gone. Ofcourse the front end dives when braking hard, but during normal driving the suspension travel is where it should be. Also even when braking hard (like emergency braking hard) I couldn't get the front to bottom out.

Uneven terrains and seams in the asphalt are now also transmitted through the front. I don't mean that every bump now hits my hands through the bars. Earlier I just didn't have any feel on the front and all the bumps were just felt when rear wheel went over them. Now I feel that I know what the bike is doing when front wheel encounters something. The difference this makes in riding is actually very big for me. Now I feel like I am actually riding the bike, telling it what to do, rather than reacting to what I feel from the rear wheel when something already has happened. Earlier the longitudinal seams were especially annoying. When front tire touched one, the bars would just tilt and I would still have no actual feel from the front tire itself. Now, when I accidentally drove into such seam, I could feel the bars wanting to turn and I countered the balance without even thinking about it. The bike just went straight as an arrow and wasn't squirming all over the place.

I won't say this makes the bike faster on track or "it transforms" the basic suspension to something unbelieveable. The construction is still pretty much as cheap as it can be, but now I would say that for me it is pretty much as good as it has to be, better suspension is wasted on me. The difference is night and day to an amateur rider and for me it's really easy to say which I prefer. If you like very soft suspension and don't mind the vagueness on the front, good for you! If you however want to actually feel what's happening and enjoy more involved feeling while riding (and also if you are closer to my weight), this should be the first modifications to the bike. Riding is so much more enjoyable now and I haven't even scratched the surface yet. Since the my damping rods are now modded, the shop can even add more damping with more shims.

I hope I get to hit the twisties this weekend before ending this driving season. For now, I am not ordering the preload caps. I need to get the proper feeling first, measure static sag again and then see what will happen. Most likely that idea will now rest for the winter.
 

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Thanks for the tip @gnarlydog

I just got my bike back from the shop with stiffer spring and more damping. The front is still not stiff by any means, but the difference is noticeable. I didn't get the chance to go on twisties since it's completely dark and 2 degrees (celsius) outside so the ride was just a short (30km) transition on highway and city speeds back to home. It is also important to remember the cold temperature makes a difference compared to usual riding temperatures during summer. Rear preload is set to 8 and seems to be well in balance with the front now.

Front end diving during normal driving is no longer noticeable. My most hated sympton of the soft front end was that when you changed from 1st to 2nd in slow speeds then front end dove. And braking was also annoying, bike seemed to be in almost constant see-saw-motion. Now that behaviour seems to be gone. Ofcourse the front end dives when braking hard, but during normal driving the suspension travel is where it should be. Also even when braking hard (like emergency braking hard) I couldn't get the front to bottom out.

Uneven terrains and seams in the asphalt are now also transmitted through the front. I don't mean that every bump now hits my hands through the bars. Earlier I just didn't have any feel on the front and all the bumps were just felt when rear wheel went over them. Now I feel that I know what the bike is doing when front wheel encounters something. The difference this makes in riding is actually very big for me. Now I feel like I am actually riding the bike, telling it what to do, rather than reacting to what I feel from the rear wheel when something already has happened. Earlier the longitudinal seams were especially annoying. When front tire touched one, the bars would just tilt and I would still have no actual feel from the front tire itself. Now, when I accidentally drove into such seam, I could feel the bars wanting to turn and I countered the balance without even thinking about it. The bike just went straight as an arrow and wasn't squirming all over the place.

I won't say this makes the bike faster on track or "it transforms" the basic suspension to something unbelieveable. The construction is still pretty much as cheap as it can be, but now I would say that for me it is pretty much as good as it has to be, better suspension is wasted on me. The difference is night and day to an amateur rider and for me it's really easy to say which I prefer. If you like very soft suspension and don't mind the vagueness on the front, good for you! If you however want to actually feel what's happening and enjoy more involved feeling while riding (and also if you are closer to my weight), this should be the first modifications to the bike. Riding is so much more enjoyable now and I haven't even scratched the surface yet. Since the my damping rods are now modded, the shop can even add more damping with more shims.

I hope I get to hit the twisties this weekend before ending this driving season. For now, I am not ordering the preload caps. I need to get the proper feeling first, measure static sag again and then see what will happen. Most likely that idea will now rest for the winter.
I am glad that the effort of changing things on your fork has made a positive difference for you.
On mine I kept the stock prings but compressed them (preload) and changed the oil to 22W (for heavy dampening effect). Of course it's not the feel one would get from a high preformance fork, but neither is the rider.
I have dual-sport tyres on mine and I am not interested to be knee-dragging, therefore the basic mods on this bike's forks is suffient for me.
 
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