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Is it me, or do the front forks on the XSR 700 look about an inch too long? I dropped my triple tree one inch down the fork. I like the looks much better. I did it for the looks, but I found that handling is much more agile.
 

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I am the opposite: I raised the fork 1" but I had to get some fork extensions. I need more ground clearance so I don't hit the sump when riding off-road. Looks are highly secondary (not that I noticed) but function is paramount. The rear aftermarket shock is length adjustable.

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When you lower your front end like you did, you also change the dynamics of the bike's front end, rake and trail. It probably is going to feel a little quicker in steering but at speed (100 mph or higher) you may also lose some stability. I like the way my bike feels both at a slow pace and when she's passing the mile markers at better than 90 or so MPH. But whatever you're happy with is all that matters really. Each rider sets their machine up the way they feel confident at all speeds.
 

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I am the opposite: I raised the fork 1" but I had to get some fork extensions. I need more ground clearance so I don't hit the sump when riding off-road. Looks are highly secondary (not that I noticed) but function is paramount. The rear aftermarket shock is length adjustable.

View attachment 25007
I don't get it. You are saying you raised the forks in the clamps which will lower the front of the bike and reduce rake and trail, as shown in the photo, then added some kind of extensions to jack it back up? Doesn't make sense. Do the change then offset it back. Need more information to understand.


When you lower your front end like you did, you also change the dynamics of the bike's front end, rake and trail. It probably is going to feel a little quicker in steering but at speed (100 mph or higher) you may also lose some stability. I like the way my bike feels both at a slow pace and when she's passing the mile markers at better than 90 or so MPH. But whatever you're happy with is all that matters really. Each rider sets their machine up the way they feel confident at all speeds.
I am one of those who will take the "nervous" feeling at significantly higher speeds for quicker handling. I don't do much over 70 partly due to the tighter roads we ride and partly due to the fact that I like to keep my money and avoid license points.

Not right for everyone for sure. Some riders want locomotive stability, really good if you are riding in places where you can spend a lot of high speed miles on the highways. Some want quicker action, really good if riding roads with a lot of tight corners. I ride the roads in the Applachian foothills and make every attempt to stay off freeways and long straight roads. If I was out west where it is possible to ride higher speeds I might stay with the stock fork positioning. I don't do it for the look, rather for the function.
 

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I’d be worried about bottoming out the front forks if I lowered it that much. Put some zip ties on the tubes to measure how far you are traveling.
 

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I don't get it. You are saying you raised the forks in the clamps which will lower the front of the bike and reduce rake and trail, as shown in the photo, then added some kind of extensions to jack it back up? Doesn't make sense. Do the change then offset it back. Need more information to understand.
OK, the image can be interpreted wrong: me dropping the triple-clamp lower and sliding the fork tubes higher. That is not the case

What you see is the fork extension protruding past the end of the OEM fork. If you look closely you can see the machining of the top and no separate cap.
These are the extensions that I screwed into the top of the fork tubes to make them longer and now the fork tubes sit lower in the clamp. The joint is hidden in the clamp area.
Sorry for the confusion :confused:

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Thank you. It gets confusing because raising the tubes would usually mean sliding the fork tubes up in the clamps lowering the bike. I now see, you are sliding the tubes down in the clamps (relative to the bottom of the clamps), the extensions allowing extending the forks beyond the actual length to get the bike higher for ground clearance.

It always gets wonky when talking about fork tube positioning in the sliders. Sliding tubes down in the clamps - toward the bottom of the clamps - will raise the bike up, and vice versa in the technical sense. So it gets goofy.
 

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After I had lowered the front end an inch, i took it out and pulled a wheelie, the fender slammed the triple tree. I then changed the fork oil to 15w and that solved my problem.
 

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An old thread I know but....my XSR was lowered by the original owner by 20mm at the rear, am thinking I may drop the forks through the yokes about 10mm at the front to compensate and quicken the steering a tad, anything to watch out for?
 

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An old thread I know but....my XSR was lowered by the original owner by 20mm at the rear, am thinking I may drop the forks through the yokes about 10mm at the front to compensate and quicken the steering a tad, anything to watch out for?
No not really. Just be aware that you are losing clearance, therefore, you will need to change the fork oil. I went to 15w instead of factory 10w. It solved the problem of pulling wheelies and slaming the fender bracket into the triple tree. I love the look. It definitely turns in to corners quicker. With the stock set up, I always felt the the front forks were too long for this bike. I hope that helps. Post a pic when you finish.
 

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No not really. Just be aware that you are losing clearance, therefore, you will need to change the fork oil. I went to 15w instead of factory 10w. It solved the problem of pulling wheelies and slaming the fender bracket into the triple tree. I love the look. It definitely turns in to corners quicker. With the stock set up, I always felt the the front forks were too long for this bike. I hope that helps. Post a pic when you finish.
Thanks buddy.
 

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Well, I took a flying leap into the Italian abyss...

ordering the Matris kit on ebay for $325, around $347 with tax. I figure, with the springs and preload adjusters, it is worth trying.



I will try to take some pictures and give an uneducated impression once done.
 

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After I had lowered the front end an inch, i took it out and pulled a wheelie, the fender slammed the triple tree. I then changed the fork oil to 15w and that solved my problem.
You didn't solve the problem. The problem is that the fender will hit if the forks bottom out when tubes are moved up in the clamps 1 inch. You just stiffened the damping enough to reduce the amount the forks will compress - at the rate of your wheelie. If it hits something hard enough it will still hit the fender. The only way you can truly solve the problem is to move the tubes back down in the clamps by 1/4-1/2 inch to be sure it will not hit under any conditions. I don't know the exact amount, maybe when I do my fork kit I will check travel before putting in the springs.
 

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Well, I took a flying leap into the Italian abyss...

ordering the Matris kit on ebay for $325, around $347 with tax. I figure, with the springs and preload adjusters, it is worth trying.



I will try to take some pictures and give an uneducated impression once done.
Get these bad boys fitted yet KLX?
 

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I have cut my spacers 10mm, changed the oil out to 12.5w, put in some K Tech linear springs, 2 x1.0mm shim washers either side of each spacer and waiting on some cheapy pre-load adjusters coming from eBay. Will drop the triple tree 7mm though the forks too. When all back together I'll let you know how it goes.
 

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I have cut my spacers 10mm, changed the oil out to 12.5w, put in some K Tech linear springs, 2 x1.0mm shim washers either side of each spacer and waiting on some cheapy pre-load adjusters coming from eBay. Will drop the triple tree 7mm though the forks too. When all back together I'll let you know how it goes.
Sounds great. Was thinking about doing the same thing but with 15w. Eager to here your results.
 

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Sounds great. Was thinking about doing the same thing but with 15w. Eager to here your results.
I reassembled the front with the fork caps as my preload adjusters aren't here yet and...it felt fantastic. Smooth over bumps and potholes, good feel, no diving under braking, just nice and slow compression. Of course, I did the worse thing as far as troubleshooting goes by changing the oil grade, cutting the spacers and putting new springs in all at once so can't say which one made the most difference but the front is now perfect I feel, for me. Also rotated the bars forward in the clamps a bit, previous owner had them right back, almost cruiser style. The sorted front does show up the back end though, so will be ordering a YSS shock. ABS light was on, and only when I got home did I realise the front wheel was in the wrong way round!! May have damaged the ABS sensor, now I have it as Yamaha intended I'll take it for another blast on Sunday and see if the ABS resets or I need a new sensor.
 
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