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Discussion Starter #1
So, I've had my xsr since October and loved covering the 3000 miles I've done on it. It's a great bike, and has done exactly what I've wanted to do.
I've organised a couple of tours into Europe and up around Scotland this year and having been out with the guys I'm travelling with I realise it'll be a struggle. They have bikes with fairings and luggage. The xsr will struggle in both these departments.
Or will it? I read EJs report saying much the same. It's a shame as I love the xsr but I've been thinking Tracer 700 as it has the same engine.
Then I thought to myself "I've only had this since October" and when I looked a thing reading it against a Tracer the price offered was pretty poor.
So I'm thinking of making the xsr more Tourable with maybe a screen and luggage but knowing it still won't be as tour friendly as a tracer.
Or selling my XSR, and putting this to a tracer. What do you guys think?
 

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In my opinion the xsr is not a touring bike..As good as it is I just don't think its made for that job.

Some people might disagree but to me its a fun, nimble, bike made for customizing and looking great.

If touring is your main objective I would buy a tracer. It has great reviews and by all accounts is a really good bike and made for that job.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was disappointed with the price the dealer wants to swap my xsr for a tracer. Considering it's only on a 66 plate. Still, they're in business and that's what it's all about. I may look at selling privately and then buying a tracer. It's in great condition.
 

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Hm. I don't think an XSR will ever compare to a tourer; if touring is the main reason you have a bike, I'd definitely go for a machine that's more touring oriented. That being said, I absolutely plan to do plenty more touring on my XSR, and I'm confident I can make it all come together better!

For me, a fairing wasn't a huge problem; I've got a reasonably large Givi screen (that's meant for a Moto Guzzi; was fairly easy to jury-rig it to fit the XSR) and Givi handguards; it's surprising how much these help with the wind blast. Sure, I got wetter than the guys on tourers, and was buffeted a bit more, but I wasn't properly uncomfortable at any point!

As for the tank range, it depends on where and with whom you're riding. I certainly don't mind having a five-minute leg-stretch every 100 miles and whilst the guys gave me a bit of stick for it, it was all good-natured. There wasn't really much danger of running out of fuel either; our route was largely pre-planned in advance so we knew there were petrol stations, almost all French petrol stations take card-at-pump payment so you can fill up at awkward hours when there's no attendant/cashier (pompiste in French..), and my sat-nav unit indicates the distance to the next petrol station, so when deciding whether to stop at one I knew how far the next one was. (Again, if these things weren't the case for you, or if you'll be riding somewhere with more than 100 miles odd between petrol stations, perhaps an XSR really isn't the right bike for the job..)

Luggage-wise, it depends on how you're touring. I think camping will always take some planning, but if you're staying in hostels or bunkhouses or whatever, I reckon you could get away with the Givi/Kappa rack (they're the same company, and their gear is totally interchangeable) and a big top-box. Dirty clothes and stuff could go into a small bag bungeed to the pillion. A small tank bag mounted on a tank ring (such as those made for the XSR by Givi and by Hepco & Becker), would be a really neat way to carry your phone, camera, Euros, ferry tickets, earplugs, sunglasses etc. so that you're not riding round with full pockets or constantly ferreting about for stuff in the top box.

If you're camping, or for whatever reason need to bring more than just a sleeping bag and a week's clothes or whatever, then I'm afraid I think extra hard luggage is going to be necessary. I really struggled (as you can see from the photographs in my post!) Both Givi/Kappa and Hepco & Becker make side-cases for the XSR. (I'm sure other companies do too, but having mostly toured on a Moto Guzzi in the past, these happen to be the ones on my radar!)

Hope this helps! And if you do take your XSR touring, please do let us know how it was!
 
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Just my two cents here, I did a tour of France (bit of Germany and Switzerland too) last year with the XSR. 12 days and 3000km, almost no highways. Most of the road trip was sunny and it was a joy to ride, the position is pretty good for long distance IMO, except for the legs (they could be a little less bended).

That being said:

- the seat is a pain: my bottom was killing me after 2 hours of riding. So when you seat for 5 hours or more, it's not fun anymore.

- When you go over 110 km/h, you need to have a strong neck. No wind protection as you know.

- With the rain; it's never fun, especially with the our bike. No protection whatsoever.

I think you can tour with any bikes and the XSR is not that bad for the job.
However, next time I will put a gel pad for my behind. I don't really mind for the wind really.
 

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@Artorius Sure, there's Ed March (and awfully impressive he is, too)! But, like, there's also Felix Baumgartner - and yet the rest of us still tend to prefer to wait for our aircraft to land before we step out of them..
 

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I understand your point of view, but I won´t buy a dirt bike if I only will go offroad 2 or 3 times on a year. Same principle on touring bikes.
I get my XSR because I mainly will use it for commuting, weekend rides and 1 or 2 roadtrips a year.
Would bought a Tracer if was the reverse order. (And if I didn't´t enjoy as much as I do riding the XSR).

But I´m the kind of guy who buys a bike with the heart. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
****. Well, Artorius, that's me exactly. Love the xsr, use it for commute, weekend rides and a couple of long weekends away per year. The xsr is perfect and I just forgot!!!
I had a Harley sportster before and it was well travelled. It was a struggle in many ways but made some great stories. If the ride is so easy, where's the stories?!
Thanks for the wake up call.
 

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It is possible to tour on the XSR - I can fit a tank bag, throwover panniers and large roll bag on top of them. It's not really suited to a top box - it would ruin the aesthetics. It works, but.....

.....the Tracer would make a much better tourer. It has more wind protection, a more comfy long distance seating position and is better suited to luggage carrying or a pillion. Dare I say, try a 650 V Strom too - you might find the engine even more engaging!

The trouble is, the XSR is such a great looking , fun-to-ride bike. You won't want to pop down to the garage to look at a Tracer, you won't glance back after you've parked it. You'll miss the XSR on the ride to work or those summer day ride-outs. Touring on an XSR will always be a compromise, but it may be worth it!
 
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