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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Adding mods to these bikes is awesome, but remember why you bought it in the first place. I put loads of mods on mine, then having got the front forks spot on I thought I'd do the same at the rear. So, I bought a YSS rear shock, easy bolt on, £240, must be worth doing right? Wrong - the spring rate is too hard for my weight (90kg) and ruined my enjoyment of the bike so much I put it up for sale. Have now put the standard shock/linkage back on and its great. Take it easy and keep enjoying the bike, and the mods that genuinely enhance it.
 

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Didn't you specify your weight and riding style when ordering? I picked up a used Ohlins but did check the other rider's settings for the shock. It was a good match and without ever changing a setting, which I will do during the next spring, I found I wasn't thinking about the rear suspension in most rougher road conditions which would have hammered me with the stock set up. I did have around 2000 miles with the stock set up.

I'd fix the shock and put it back on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks but I'm not throwing good money after bad. If the stock spring supplied is too harsh for my weight then I am not buggering around with lighter springs etc just to keep my teeth in my head. The point I was making was try something first, on another riders bike etc and if you cannot specify weight/riding style (as you can't with YSS) then don't risk it.
 

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It's a passion/hobby for some and in that respect it's great to mod everything. For most riders changing out all this on a bike Yamaha pre configured a particular way is a waste of money, not time because if you replace the suspension yourself for the first time you have learned a new skill. First time riders or casual riders looking for the xsr700 to be a high spec bike, to me, just need to master this bike for how it rides standard, and then later decide if they want to trade it in for a higher spec bike in the future. The next gen xsr900 will and probably the next gen xsr700 will have more adjustable suspension oem. Of course I'm way off base if someone is so passionate about the xsr700 being a forever bike that they just want the very most out of it and are willing to dump 1-2 thousand dollars more into it.
 

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It's a passion/hobby for some and in that respect it's great to mod everything. For most riders changing out all this on a bike Yamaha pre configured a particular way is a waste of money, not time because if you replace the suspension yourself for the first time you have learned a new skill. First time riders or casual riders looking for the xsr700 to be a high spec bike, to me, just need to master this bike for how it rides standard, and then later decide if they want to trade it in for a higher spec bike in the future. The next gen xsr900 will and probably the next gen xsr700 will have more adjustable suspension oem. Of course I'm way off base if someone is so passionate about the xsr700 being a forever bike that they just want the very most out of it and are willing to dump 1-2 thousand dollars more into it.
I'd agree, for someone like me it is worth spending the money. The 700 is the bike I wanted, could have bought an MT-09 for $800 more, but I don't want or need that kind of power and a bunch of digital distraction. I spent the $800 on suspension. I put on an exhaust, not for performance, but for the look I wanted and much better tone without drastic volume. Plus some custom work that was money spent, like replacing the lollipop tail light and cannon headlight.

If I was going to change bikes in a year or so I'd not have bothered doing anything to the bike. I'd ride it until I changed out. That does make sense. I wouldn't change a thing other than getting comfortable ergonomics, which might not cost a cent. I'd ride it until I wanted something new.
 

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Hi all,

got the front forks spot......bought a YSS rear shock, spring rate is too hard for my weight
Mav617, if your forks are spot on its only because you did your research and found the charts that lay out oil viscosity, spring rate (or you were just damn lucky).

Why would you think a rear shock is any different? You got to lookup what spring rate is right for your weight & riding style, and specify that spring when you order.

Then order what's "spot on". Research, it's a thing
 

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Hi all,

Adding mods to these bikes is awesome, but remember why you bought it in the first place. I put loads of mods on mine, then having got the front forks spot on I thought I'd do the same at the rear. So, I bought a YSS rear shock, easy bolt on, £240, must be worth doing right? Wrong - the spring rate is too hard for my weight (90kg) and ruined my enjoyment of the bike so much I put it up for sale. Have now put the standard shock/linkage back on and its great. Take it easy and keep enjoying the bike, and the mods that genuinely enhance it.
What is your setup on rear suspension 0-9 please? I have 90 kg too. I got it second hand and setup was on 9 already. First time I try the bike I though it was the softest setup. When I check the manual I finded its on 9. I dont feel it hard. I am using the flat seat not the standard. Could be softer that standart and reason I dont feel it too firm. B Roads in my country are not good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What is your setup on rear suspension 0-9 please? I have 90 kg too. I got it second hand and setup was on 9 already. First time I try the bike I though it was the softest setup. When I check the manual I finded its on 9. I dont feel it hard. I am using the flat seat not the standard. Could be softer that standart and reason I dont feel it too firm. B Roads in my country are not good.
On the standard shock I run on 4 clicks out on the rear and its fine for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Mav617, if your forks are spot on its only because you did your research and found the charts that lay out oil viscosity, spring rate (or you were just damn lucky).

Why would you think a rear shock is any different? You got to lookup what spring rate is right for your weight & riding style, and specify that spring when you order.

Then order what's "spot on". Research, it's a thing
Hence the bit about not being able to specify the spring from the seller - you get whatever is fitted and this one (56-120-150) is way too stiff so I'm selling the shock. Someone else may benefit as a new spring that is less hard can be bought for around £70, but then you need someone with a spring compressor and I'm just disappointed with the whole scenario so better to cut my losses.
 

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I got a good deal on my 2018 XSR700 and after a few hundred miles decided it was a keeper. Along with a few cosmetic mods, I installed an Ohlins rear shock sprung for my weight and Ohlins cartridges in the front. I also installed an Akra exhaust. It took a while to dial in the shocks and cartridges, and I'm not 100% sure I'm there yet- but I can say that before I started tuning them, the new parts were a 0% improvement over stock. Now, the compliance, general ride comfort, and cornering confidence is tremendously enhanced. All of this is to say upgraded suspension isn't magical- it provides the flexibility to get the bike more in line with your weight, intended use, and skills, but you have to either get expert help or be willing to get some knowledge and put in some time tweaking it to your taste. At that point it's worth it. And lastly, this is going to sound stupid- but stay on top of tire pressure. Proper tire pressure is incredibly important to this bike. Any bike really, but for some reason this bike really doesn't like even slightly under-inflated tires.
 
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