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Discussion Starter #1
My 2016 XSR700 has the usual rust creeping along the welded seam on the R/H side, and at points further in where its difficult to clean.
I have bitten the bullet and bought a used swing arm, at a pretty good price, to get it powder coated (hopefully before everywhere shuts down from Christmas to New Year).
The idea being to have a repainted arm ready to fit when I come to do the job. The bike is my daily driver and so I want to limit the time it is off the road.
Its a good opportunity to check the S/A bearings and other suspension points as the bike is approaching 30k miles.
Any experience out there of whether new bearings are likely to be needed ?
But my big reason for posting is, I'm not a big fan of the matt frame finish, maybe its "a cool look" but it holds salt and grim more firmly than a gloss finish.
Obviously if I just get a gloss black powder coat it will be a screaming miss-match with the rest of the frame parts. So if I want a gloss finish, what would look good?
I'm thinking that maybe a gloss silver/alluminium could be quite attractive.
What d'you think ?
 

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I am a powder coater, and I usually use Prismatic Powders when I buy powder.
There are dozens of blacks, in a variety of levels of gloss. And they have short videos, of samples slowly spinning, so you get a pretty good idea what it looks like.
I've heard others complain that the swingarm can show rust, mine has been kept indoors, shows zero corrosion.
I suspect the factory used e-coating, or something cheap like that. A quality Powder Coating (even Matte) should hold up for years, even with a bit of salt spray.
 

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Powder coating only if done correctly, including prep work. I had powder coating done on a set of new steelies for my pick up. Rust under the powder coating all over the rims, emanating from where the centers join the rims. I'd be asking for some kind of guarantee on the job from what I experienced. Someone would have to have some serious recommendations that I could confer with and see work before I'd ever do powder coating again.

Personally I would paint just because of that, and the ease of touch up if needed or repaint if desired. Fact is I'd spend big bucks on a ceramic coating if I could afford it. That is one maintenance free finish. I've had ceramic on an exhaust system on my dual sport that was pretty much ignored for about 10 years with no corrosion and only a bit of dullness due to heat on the head pipe.
 

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Rust under the powder coating
That was just bad luck you connected with a less experienced pcoater. I have powdered all kinds of bike parts especially bike rims and always looks and lasts. Just find the right guys and all is kosher
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks. I have experienced various qualities of powdercoat over the years. The worst being some that was ridiculosely brittle and chipped with the slightest knock.
Currently I have an outfit nearby which seems to know what they are doing.
Colourwise, I just thought, if I'm getting it done, its an opportunity to think about colour. Its a decision I took when I needed to get the tank panels done as the bike came to me with a serious dent in one of them. The bike is a "70th Anniversary" model and had the yellow panels, which I didn't particularly like so I got them done in a nice scarlet, with the classic black & white decal along the bottom Which I think looks really good. I also have a 7" round headlamp (with an LED Denali fitted) which helps the classic look.
The silver/aluminium idea for the swing arm came from my 1990 XT600E that sits beside it in the garage.
As for paint, I'm sure it can survive well enough in some parts of the world, but through a UK winter, the hard to get at places will rust, just as the original finish has done
 

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Sometimes I think, it is what you not have, that you desire...

At my former XJR I powder coated the silver alu swing arm to black. Here at little XSR I would go for a silver swing arm and a glossy black frame. The frame for sure powder coated. Regarding the swing arm, I am a little undecided. So I'm still looking for a Tracer swing arm to get the better chain adjusters and a longer wheel base as well. I do not know if the Tracer swing arm is alu or a folded and welded steel work as the XSR is.

And this built of steel profiles make the swing arm a little tricky to powder coat. In the left arm there is a rubber klotz inside, which may avoid a proper rust prevention when glass or sand blasting. The unwelded edges of the profiles are still a gap, which I would deny to powder coat.
The needle bearings which are used are always a pain to change. So if they are okay, I would leave them in place. This means as well, painting the swing arm only. But, as already suggested by you, @Thislldo , a silver colour would be great.

BR
hombacher
 

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I've noticed that a lot of riders from the UK complain about rust on the swingarm while most from the dryer climates don't have as much trouble and that's simply because the arm on our bikes is stamped and welded steel. I really don't know much about powder coating myself but like any surface coating, the prep work defines what the final job will perform like. Even a simple paint job will last longer and look better when the surface is prepped correctly. Grab any rattle can of paint and look at the directions. Prep, prep, and prep, and the job will look much better that a hurried effort to complete the project. Obviously in Yamaha's case, the work on the swingarm is done with robotic help. They do a pretty good job, all in all, but the poor swingarm gets all the crap that's thrown up from the front wheel and everything else that's on the road so it is like sandblasting the thing with everything from salt, water, stones, etc. Then put a long weld right in the way and we all know a weld is a good place for rust to start because the surface of a weld is porous by nature. The best you can do is to make darned sure that weld is completely clean before you put anything over it. On the last bike I refurbed (a 1980 XS650) I used a product called Evapo-Rust to soak a lot of parts that were pretty rusted before laying down any paint. It takes a while to let it soak, up to 12 hours depending on the depth of the rust itself, but it will take care of the rust and you'll end up with a surface that will hold whatever you are using much better and keep any future rust from appearing. Personally I like an aluminum color on swingarms but it will show dirt a lot more than a darker surface. And whether you paint or powder coat, make sure your part is ready or that whoever does your job will do it right. The chances are if it's cheap, it won't be dne right, no matter which way you go.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Again, thanks guys.
I'm settled on a silver colour, it will go well with the ally side panels and I think will lighten the look of the rear end.
I don't quite catch what Bombacher means by "a rubber klotz" inside the arm. I don't see anything that might bethat on the parts diagram.
I understand fully about plugging holes and masking any necessary areas and the undesirability of blasting medium getting inside, and needle roller swing arm bearings are always a pain. Life is like that.
 

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As I had said - you need an absolutely reliable coater, otherwise it will chip and rust. Happens that I don't have a reliable source here. And I'd go for a bright silver ceramic coat if it makes sense. The stuff is near impervious to damage and corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Every powder coater worth their name here does their own blast cleaning.
I'll look into the ceramic coating option.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Ok.
Spare swing arm has just arrived. Nice condition except for the usual developing rust areas.
But I now see what Hombacher meant by "a rubber klotz" inside there.
Apologies mate, I wasn't dis believing you, just wasn't sure what you meant. And sure enough, there it is, some sort of substantial rubber thing. For what? damping vibration?
It might be possible to extract it, but I wouldn't be very hopeful about re inserting it.
So I'm sure that powder coating would be out, unless it can survive the oven.
Is this thing going to be a problem with ceramic coating?
There's a place 5 miles from me I can tanke it to, and see what they say.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ok.
Spare swing arm has just arrived. Nice condition except for the usual developing rust areas.
But I now see what Hombacher meant by "a rubber klotz" inside there.
Apologies mate, I wasn't dis believing you, just wasn't sure what you meant. And sure enough, there it is, some sort of substantial rubber thing. For what? damping vibration?
It might be possible to extract it, but I wouldn't be very hopeful about re inserting it.
So I'm sure that powder coating would be out, unless it can survive the oven.
Is this thing going to be a problem with ceramic coating?
There's a place 5 miles from me I can tanke it to, and see what they say.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Having given the arm a good scub. In a good light I can see that the "rubber klotz" is in there for keeps. Too big, and too firm a fit, to extract through the narrowing end of the swing arm.
I am worried that any powder coater (and maybe also ceramic coaters) will take one look at this imovable rubber insert and say "no can do".
Has anybody succeeded in having an XSR700 swing arm powder (or ceramic) coated with this insert in place.
To me it looks as if it must hav3e been filled as the arm was assembled and welded, so it must be capable of surviving some heat. But I realise that that may not be the same as the oven heat for powder coating.
 
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