XSR 700 Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I checked the chain adjusting block hash markers on my 2019 when it was new. They were off. Not by a lot, but definitely off.

Using calipers I'd check the distance from end of swingarm to chain adjust slide cover on chain side. Then use calipers to set the opposite side same distance. Then lay down behind bike, rotate wheel backwards, then visually confirm the rear sprocket and chain point directly to front sprocket.

And it would be perfect, and yet the chain adjusting covers hash marks never agreed.

Recently that fuji nut siezed on axle and cutting it off caused me to order new axle, and both chain adjusting slide covers.

Guess what, using new parts after confirming wheel alignment with calipers, the hash marks for chain adjust are still off, but only about half as bad.

Bottom line, you may want to use calipers to adjust chain & align rear wheel, and confirm with your eye looking down the chain at the rear to front sprocket. Yamaha picked the dam cheapest chain adjusting blocks in the useless parts room to throw on this fundamentally fantastic motorcycle.

It's up to us to find what needs sorted out, what Yamaha intentionally neglected, and get it done. They don't build cheap bikes, but they neglect intentionally
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
There is quite a variety of different methods for chain adjustment on motorcycles and even the markings can be laid out in different ways. Going back to the 70's, the best method was to straight-line the tire/wheels and once it's true, every time the chain needed adjusting just turn each side a quarter of a turn each time to keep things even and that's worked pretty good for me. Back then, you were adjusting your chain darned near once a week if you rode much. I've got almost 9000 on my bike now and only had to adjust the chain twice. Of course, I do clean and lube it frequently. But that's another story because it seems some people keep a clean chain and others don't seem to give a hoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Chain should be measured for how much it moves up and down, that is it, adjust if needed. Clean and lubricate routinely. I have had chains for 15-20 years
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
I will measure from the swing arm pivot center to the rear axle center to verify alignment. Of course that's relying on the fact that the swing arm pivot is in the correct place in the frame, but I do take that for granted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I will measure from the swing arm pivot center to the rear axle center to verify alignment
MK my friend, I'm just a bit too lazy to go for your more certain measure. It's just too easy to take my cheap manual calipers, extend the end, and poke from the rear to get the correct measure I'm after from the side I already adjusted the chain on, then poke the other to see is it the same.

Remember I'm an old man com'in apart, if I lay down on the garage floor, I may not get up again haha.

Good to hear from you my knowledgeable, wise Amigo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
I may have to take a look at your method, it would be easier. I just had the habit over the past since the 80s. If I checked and found the measures per side (equal or not) once it is positioned properly, that would be far quicker... and I do have a cheap caliper (bought used about 35 years ago, Fowlers, probably not cheap when new) that I can use.

Anything to be easier... and affordable. After all, we could make it really easy taking it to a shop and sayling "Please adjust my chain." at the service counter. Or buy a bike with shaft drive! ;)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top