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Discussion Starter #1
Hello folks,


i want to invest in some protection since i think the chances are good that i will send my bike on a slide down the road sooner or later.
Now i am wondering about the cost-benefit ratio of buing a whole set of frontachsle- rearachsle- and framesliders. Mostly i see bikes with either framesliders or achsle sliders, but rarely both of them. Is that a wrong estimation?
What are the most important sliders from your point of view?
 

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Both, if you can.

My bike wears both framesliders and rear axle ones. I will install front axle sliders as soon as my budget allows me.

imho, the idea of sliders is to be scratched instead of any other bike piece, in case of. Do you consider that with just a combination no piece at all can be scratched?. Good, then.

I think that framesliders don't protect the center area because they are to close to the longitudinal axis of the bike and that framesliders don't protect enought the fork, the disks or the tail.
 

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ive laid down my XSR twice. once on each side, first time messed up my water pump, crank case cover, and brake pedal was bent inwards easy, costly fix i got R&G Racing Aero Frame Sliders. then a year later i slid on some gravel and laid it down on the other side this time the handlebars were bent, frame slider helped alot but the shift pedal was bent in like the brake side was and the crankcase cover was scratched.
i ended up investing in some Womet-tech frame sliders off TST Industries
Yoshimura Case Saver Kit from Revzilla. (actual metal)
both look good and discreet.
 

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The best protection you can give your bike is to learn how to ride within the conditions of the road and that means keep the speed within the limits to have the rubber down and the shiny side up. Nothing else will protect your investment better. 55 years on the road speaking here.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The best protection you can give your bike is to learn how to ride within the conditions of the road and that means keep the speed within the limits to have the rubber down and the shiny side up. Nothing else will protect your investment better. 55 years on the road speaking here.

That's for sure. Still, there is a relatively high risk of a crash at the beginning of the learning process, right?
 

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That's for sure. Still, there is a relatively high risk of a crash at the beginning of the learning process, right?

Yeah. Not only that. I know due to bitter personal experience that, at anytime, any 4 wheeler can push your precious treasure and make it fall.
 

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Training and kilometers are the only two things which will bring you away from the beginner point of riding. I am with @Flyerdon, only by training, you will avoid crashes.


The bad thing of crashes is, that they are unpredictable and most of them are different. So crash pads can be nice and prevent severe damage, or they can just break/bend the frame and/or engine case. Most crash pads or crash bars are either nice to look at or they may work if the worst comes to the worst, but they are not both.

Example:



It is a combination of the standard orange crash bars at the side, aluminium crash bars at the handle bar and handcrafted axle crash pads.
The bars, because easy to source and give a good protection. The aluminium at the handle bar can be critical on sliding over asphalt, due its high decelerating attitude compared to steel or plastic. The axle pads are big (much bigger than the commercial ones) and will give the chance to slide. In general there is built up a three points system on which the bike can slide or fall on before sliding. This can be handle bar/foot rest/axle pad or any other three point combination on each side, which may vary.

Worst case would be the turn over of the bike.


Back to the XSR, it will be a similar configuration. The XSR steel weights or bar ends are very good sliders. Some handcrafted axle sliders or those commercial rear combination of plastic paddock stand bobbins/sliders will be good.
I would suggest the B&G or similar plastic motor covers for the engine case, these Yoshimura pads as shown may work as well. And for the the big holes in the frame, where those fancy frame covers are sold for, I would go for some handcrafted frame plastic bobbins.

That is all you need if you want to be protective. Otherwise, ride, train and let the unexpected come as it is...


BR
hombacher
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Update: As a first step, i went for GSG axle sliders (front and back, got a 10%-off deal). From my point of view, this Yoshimura kit and similar products are way to expensive, especially because they are just saving the visual appearance, nothing critical. Also for me, they impair the look of the bike. Same for the frame sliders.
 

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Training and kilometers are the only two things which will bring you away from the beginner point of riding. I am with @Flyerdon, only by training, you will avoid crashes.


The bad thing of crashes is, that they are unpredictable and most of them are different. So crash pads can be nice and prevent severe damage, or they can just break/bend the frame and/or engine case. Most crash pads or crash bars are either nice to look at or they may work if the worst comes to the worst, but they are not both.

Example:



It is a combination of the standard orange crash bars at the side, aluminium crash bars at the handle bar and handcrafted axle crash pads.
The bars, because easy to source and give a good protection. The aluminium at the handle bar can be critical on sliding over asphalt, due its high decelerating attitude compared to steel or plastic. The axle pads are big (much bigger than the commercial ones) and will give the chance to slide. In general there is built up a three points system on which the bike can slide or fall on before sliding. This can be handle bar/foot rest/axle pad or any other three point combination on each side, which may vary.

Worst case would be the turn over of the bike.


Back to the XSR, it will be a similar configuration. The XSR steel weights or bar ends are very good sliders. Some handcrafted axle sliders or those commercial rear combination of plastic paddock stand bobbins/sliders will be good.
I would suggest the B&G or similar plastic motor covers for the engine case, these Yoshimura pads as shown may work as well. And for the the big holes in the frame, where those fancy frame covers are sold for, I would go for some handcrafted frame plastic bobbins.

That is all you need if you want to be protective. Otherwise, ride, train and let the unexpected come as it is...


BR
hombacher
Cracking post, hombacher. Well reasoned and thought out explanation, appreciated.
 
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