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Discussion Starter #1
So working with Galfer on a setup, I was planning on very carefully laying out a mockup of the custom lines with exact fitting angles I will be needing to do something I hope is a bit clever, I discovered something that I think is both amazing and scary as hell.

Rotatable banjo fittings. That's right, read about it here, after they make your lines and crimp the fittings, they say you can rotate them 360 degrees if necessary. Are they serious? I'm supposed to trust brake lines, rotatable fittings, with pressures reaching 5000 psi?

Anyone know or have experience about this, please do jump in here, I need some kind of confirmation that I just don't understand that they can both be rotated to release twist tension and still can be trusted with my life. Here is the link to the FAQs page with the description:

Rotatable fittings, or better known as death by stupidity
 

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Nothing new or special...

If the manufacturer says so, than follow his instructions. There are fixed banjos, mostly the old screwed types, which are not admitted to rotate and meanwhile disappeared out of road traffic hopefully.

The pressed types and additionally the declaration of the manufacturer and you can rotated them. I would tend to do so in certain limits, the given 360° is a lot, and why should I? When installing the new lines it is good to avoid any twisting and release it by rotating one of the banjos.

Generally I feel more comfortable if the manufacturer hands out a set of plastic brackets which you put around the crimped area and press it with your pliers or in the vice. You will also feel how little force is needed to rotate the banjo.
 

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I've never heard of such a brake line, but new inventions are coming out all the time. Whenever I'm doing a plumbing job, I use shark fittings a lot and you can turn the heck out of them after installation. Of course their not running near the pressure but you can turn them practically forever and not hint of leaking even when bending the lines quite severely.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can kind of see (because of making my own in the olden tymes) that the inner (real) hose has a small "collar" slipped on it, just before the banjo is inserted (and the SS is carefully pushed back out of the way to not let any strands get trapped between that "collar" and banjo), that as pressure builds in the line that collar would be pressed even harder into the banjo "compression" area (while the banjo can not move or blow out of the end of the hose) because of the crimp.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Spiegler is doing it to, they even give you a plastic tool to grip the crimp in a vise while you rotate the banjo.

Rotate banjos

Old dog learns new trick. How to release tension in ss braided lines without making them twice.
 
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