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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like the looks of this XSR but I'm not sure I'd call it a scrambler:

The first hint of mud would jam under that front mudguard and shouldn't it have a bash plate? Seat looks comfortable though and the headlamp mounting would have made my life easier during my fork upgrade.

OK, let's call it a street scrambler (or have Triumph got that name already ? :) )
 

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I like the looks of this XSR but I'm not sure I'd call it a scrambler:

The first hint of mud would jam under that front mudguard and shouldn't it have a bash plate? Seat looks comfortable though and the headlamp mounting would have made my life easier during my fork upgrade.

OK, let's call it a street scrambler (or have Triumph got that name already ? :) )
Absolutely. I would appreciate some clearance under the front mudguard and under the exhaust
 

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Not sure about what the term "scrambler" has become in your country, but since the 60s for me here in the USA it is pretty much a high pipe street bike. My first off roader was a Sherpa T and my friend had a "dual sport" Matador. "Scramblers" were the Honda CL line and the BSA/Triumph with high pipes - street bikes with high pipes. They could putter around in the dirt, but when push came to shove, the trails here in the east U.S., the real off road and street legal dirt bikes would go where the "scramblers" were stuck.

Having started with off roaders and a trials bike specifically I still see the same thing. Even the desert racers in the U.S. went to the Husqvarnas and other real off road light weights once they figured it out - or rather got their clocks cleaned by some rider on a light two stroke. So I have no illusions about "scramblers". They're still high pipe street bikes, but now some have more suspension travel. A light one that some riders rave about being light are heavier than a near 100 lb lighter dual sport that the same riders would complian about being too heavy.

That's kind of what "scramblers" are to those of us who've been around for a while here. They have more of a nostalgia thing going on in the U.S. Sure guys are riding them in off road condtions, but still most any dual sport is easier to ride and can go places that would stick the scramblers. They do look cool and riders who want to do them, that's peachy, more power to them. If I had more room to keep stuff I'd likely have one in the "collection". I mainly have an XSR for street and a KLX for dual sport, a project SR500 street tracker, and a couple others.

This post isn't really meant to deride those who like the adventure of the scramblers, but rather to kind of define what they were as I came up in Ohio. I just remember guys on scramblers doing hill climbs and the trails that were pretty much child's play on our off roaders, but then again they could run on roads for hundreds of miles that would have us worn out on our off roaders. Everything's a compromise.

The XSR may be considered a scrambler, but don't confuse that with serious dual sport and off road bikes. They can be great within the limits, but the off road side has serious limits. Much as a dual sport has has serious limits on road. Have fun with the XSR, get dirty if that's the plan, but don't pass up a chance to ride off road on a dual sport if you get the chance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I suppose the name "scrambler" to me evokes the the competition which is now known as motocross. Then, it was big capacity 4 stroke singles plugging away through large quantities of mud. The meaning has evolved and my urban/bike dictionary hasn't.
We never got the CL (or SL) Hondas in the UK although they are now available as US imports and I'm not sure the high pipe Triumphs were sold here either.
 

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Kind of figured that, we here kind of trailed behind. That's why I kind of emphasized that it was my experience here. Maybe you guys were too smart to accept a really heavy street twin with high pipes as a serious off roader. Certainly no comparison to the old 500 thumpers and definitely not to the two strokes like the Greeves.

The fact that the Hondas were called Scramblers is probably why scrambles never took on the same meaning as in the UK and I guess Europe in general. No one was racing bikes like the 250 Scrambler seriously on motocross tracks and the only serious racing most did on them back then was Baja and other more open desert racing.

Do they still call motocross scrambling or scrambles in the UK? I know we do have hare scrambles racing, which is closed circuit usually a couple miles of natural rough woods terrain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Do they still call motocross scrambling or scrambles in the UK?
I think the term motocross has replaced it unless it is preceded by "vintage". It's interesting to watch motorcyle events evolve - something starts to become popular, people claim it's now too expensive to compete so an offshoot appears. Now beach racing seems to be gaining in popularity with classes for "race what you've brought" to make it less expensive.
 

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Yeah, in American flat track there was the "run what ya brung" stuff that was called Hooligan racing, but it evolved into a second definitely more serious Super Hooligan racing, where the riders worked the stock chassis over, did the suspension, and had some modifications allowed to the engine. Turns out they put on as good a show as the other classes. The modified bikes, Sportsters most common, cost upward of $25,000 for a serious competitor.

There was a beach drag race started up again in New Jersey called The Race Of Gentlemen (TROG) that has serious limits, only pre-war cars running flat heads, not sure if they allow pre-war OHV or not. A flagged off start running 1/8 mile on the beach. They also include flat head bikes too now.
 
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