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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this in the Tenere 700 forum and don't know if it made it around the horn. I added the emphasis on some parts:

Just wanted to let you folks now I had an interesting and disappointing situation with my new Tenere. Last week I reached my 600 mile break-in so I changed the oil. The drain plug from the dealership was on really tight. After draining the oil I put the plug back in. I followed the instructions in the service manual which called for 32 ft/lbs of torque. However, I managed the strip the threads and partially squash the strainer cover assembly (the OEM name). Of course, I was surprised and horrified.​
I rechecked my torque wrench about 10x and it was set to only 30 ft/lbs. Suspecting the wrench failed I checked it against another and it seemed to be okay. I did not "calibrate" the wrench, but merely checked it against the "feel" of another to determine they about the same.​
I brought the bike to the dealer for repair and explained the story. In the meantime, I checked the torque specs on other motorcycles: KLR650 (17 ft/lbs); Husqvarna 350 (15 ft/lbs); Triumph Tiger (17 ft/lbs). Why does the Tenere call for 32 lbs? Seems like a lot by comparison, even if the bolt is big. I can't send a picture because the bike is in the shop right now.​
Long story short: Yamaha agreed this was too much torque for this plug, and said they will no longer recommend 32 ft/lbs. Yamaha will cover the cost of the part and the repair, but unfortunately, the part is on backorder with no ETA at this time. Bummer since the riding season is quickly coming to a close. I wanted to warn other Tenere riders to be careful with the plug.​

I think it probably shows how few people actually torque drain plugs, but for those that do, make the spec 15 ft-lb or 180 in-lb, convert to N-m if needed. Those of you who do not use a torque wrench on the drain, remember that not everyone has "the torque wrench arm". Working in a shop for a lot of years I can attest to that fact with all the drain plug and spark plug holes that needed heli-coiled, not to mention fork axle cap studs snapped off.
 

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Oh dear - sorry to read this one. I mentioned the high torque setting for the sump plug when I took my Tenere (same figure as XSR) in for its first service. The dealer said 'not to worry' as they NEVER use a torque wrench on sump nuts....quote: "It's a sure way to strip the thread". The old rule of 'hand tight, then a bit more' is a lot safer on sump nuts. Good to see that Yamaha stepped up, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Again, there are people who can break a steel ball bearing with a rubber mallet. I know a Kawasaki servicee manager that gave torque wrenches to their set up guys, seemet there was a rash of snapped off axle cap studs among other damaged fasteners from said old rule of 'hand tight, then a bit more'. I guarantee you 99-44/100% of all stripped drain plugs and spark plug holes were done using the old rule of 'hand tight, then a bit more' . Probably half of them didn't own a torque wrench or how to use it.

Fact is when I was doing Honda set up I used my inch-lb wrench on every fastener posstble, that way if there was a problem it was well known I did it by the book.

If your service manager and others had contacted Yamaha about the situation it might have brought it to light at all dealerships and stopped a lot of damaged drain threads.
 

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I found this in the Tenere 700 forum and don't know if it made it around the horn. I added the emphasis on some parts:

Just wanted to let you folks now I had an interesting and disappointing situation with my new Tenere. Last week I reached my 600 mile break-in so I changed the oil. The drain plug from the dealership was on really tight. After draining the oil I put the plug back in. I followed the instructions in the service manual which called for 32 ft/lbs of torque. However, I managed the strip the threads and partially squash the strainer cover assembly (the OEM name). Of course, I was surprised and horrified.​
I rechecked my torque wrench about 10x and it was set to only 30 ft/lbs. Suspecting the wrench failed I checked it against another and it seemed to be okay. I did not "calibrate" the wrench, but merely checked it against the "feel" of another to determine they about the same.​
I brought the bike to the dealer for repair and explained the story. In the meantime, I checked the torque specs on other motorcycles: KLR650 (17 ft/lbs); Husqvarna 350 (15 ft/lbs); Triumph Tiger (17 ft/lbs). Why does the Tenere call for 32 lbs? Seems like a lot by comparison, even if the bolt is big. I can't send a picture because the bike is in the shop right now.​
Long story short: Yamaha agreed this was too much torque for this plug, and said they will no longer recommend 32 ft/lbs. Yamaha will cover the cost of the part and the repair, but unfortunately, the part is on backorder with no ETA at this time. Bummer since the riding season is quickly coming to a close. I wanted to warn other Tenere riders to be careful with the plug.​

I think it probably shows how few people actually torque drain plugs, but for those that do, make the spec 15 ft-lb or 180 in-lb, convert to N-m if needed. Those of you who do not use a torque wrench on the drain, remember that not everyone has "the torque wrench arm". Working in a shop for a lot of years I can attest to that fact with all the drain plug and spark plug holes that needed heli-coiled, not to mention fork axle cap studs snapped off.
Did the exact same thing! Bought a new oil pan and all good - will NEVER EVER use a torque wrench on an oil pan again. Stripped like butter....
 

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Did the exact same thing! Bought a new oil pan and all good - will NEVER EVER use a torque wrench on an oil pan again. Stripped like butter....
I'll add - doint the pan replacement was so easy - taking it to a shop to do is a waste of $$.
 

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Ya, it's true about only using torque wrench on internal dynamic parts. I could never bring myself to use a trq wrench on oil plug. It's just to easy to snug it, then you can feel it "crush seal" that washer as you give it a bit more.

I do good with hard parts, but I still over filled the oil in this bike I think 3 times stupid
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'd be hard pressed to tell someone I really don't know well enough to know mechanical skills, to hand tighten snug. Some would strip out threads, others may have the plug loosen and back out. Ever hear how some people buy a used bike only to find all kinds of stripped out fasteners and plugs? If I tell them to "Just tighten it up tight." and it strips out or falls out then I'm the bad guy. No thanks.

Sure most would do it right, but I'd hate to have someone say "Markk53 said turn it tight by hand and I... (pick your choice)
"I stripped out the threads and I didn't tighten it that tight!"​
"I had the drain plug fall out dumping all the oil!"​

If Yamaha says it, they can be held responsible.
 

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I'd be hard pressed to tell someone I really don't know well enough to know mechanical skills, to hand tighten snug
You are so right, forget my advice.

I had older brothers, a motoman and a car mechanic, it just rolled that way for me 'cause I was mentored. You just learn stuff working wide range of equipment and transportation growing up rural, with dad & kin nearby
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I remember how pathetic we were working on bicycles using only a poorly adjusted Crescent wrench... I remember how happy I was when my dad got a set of Vise-Grips... Now I could remove all the rounded off axle nuts I ruined with the Crescent wrench! Rounded handlebar bolts, seat clamp nuts, stem bolts... you name it, we destroyed it!

My father was a civil engineer, my friend's father a plumber. You'd think one of them might give us a bit of guidance and real wrenches to fit the nuts and bolts.

Then there were the stripped axle threads...

I was still iffy when I got the Sherpa T, but actually did get some sockets and wrenches, a bit lighter touch and used a torque wrench when rebuilding the Sherpa S from the crank up. As somewhat natural as some of what I do may seem, I sure as hell wasn't skilled to start. Keep that in mind when any of you advise someone to tighten a fastener or plug tight. They may not have a clue how tight is "tight".

Think of it like this - my wife has an incredible singing voice, pretty much has a great ear for music and tone. Should she assume that everyone else is just like her and that it should be a breeze for them to stand up in front of an audience and sing? How many of you would stand up in front of an audience and sing, because she told you it was easy, just open your mouth and have a go at it. :rolleyes: :eek: :ROFLMAO:
 
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