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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I’m a new to motorcycle ownership, and I have an abundance of likely dumb questions hopefully some of y’all can help me sort out. I just bought a 700 and purchased an akrapovic high mount exhaust system. I have the tools, but I seem to learn everything through trial and error and want to avoid any costly fuckups Do I need to remap anything on my ECU first? Or after? Does anyone know anything about these flash tune flashing kits? Or best bet to take it to a Yamaha dealer and pay them $650 to do something I can maybe do for $350 and an hour on a laptop? Any detailed advice would be much appreciated.
 

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Hi and Welcome to the forums. Congratulations to your new ride, enjoy it.

For an Akrapovic high mount is no remap, newmap or othermap needed,

BR
hombacher
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, and can you elaborate more and grow my confidence? Do I need to do anything to the bike or just bolt on and ready? It won’t throw any faults or error codes? From what I heard, these bikes come from the factory lean and pretty much need tuned out the box? I’m not worried about 1 bhp or half ft/lbs torque...I really don’t want to mess with ecu or tuning it if I don’t have to, but I really don’t want to damage engine. Much appreciation.
 

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I wanted a better tone exhaust, like you, not concerned about the nth horsepower, just looks and tone. Like you, I didn't want to have to mess with the ECU. So when I added a Delkevic exhaust I contacted Delkevic before the purchase and asked them about the ECU as well as volume. They said no ECU flash needed and sound was around 96dB. I'd suggest the same for the Akrapovic, contact them and ask.
 

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You, @JLee can bolt on and ready. Unplug the O2 sensor first and then unscrew it and the other way around when reinstalling. Only after the O2 sensor is plugged in again, fire up your bike. Most of the mechanical installation of the exhaust is self explaining. If something does not fit or has to be bended or stretched, then your installing is wrong, not the exhaust.
Because it is an Akrapovic. This is as well the reason, that with the three regulary offered types, the low one (not the race), the double one and the high up, they all do not need any remap of the ECU.

From what you heard, the mystery of lean is an urban legend. It even gets worse, if so called tuning experts are talking about lean running bikes and write it up on their websites. No idea why the legend came up, maybe simple minds wanted to explain how modern combustion engines can meet the valid regulations. Or paint a scenery in which people are regulated by anyhow restrictions?
An injected bike with a catalysator will run at lambda and only at lambda. Most Japanese have even a more conservative tune which means rich. So there is nothing to worry about.

Believing the lean mystery makes only your wallet lean...
 

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Welcome to the forums and congrats on the new bike and becoming a rider!

I just installed a new exhaust too, and had many of the same questions. The reason people say you need to remap the ECU is because the airflow through the new exhaust may be different from the old one, and thus the airflow through the engine will be as well. However, it seems like a lot of exhaust manufacturers keep this in mind when designing their pipes, and I also think the ECU compensates for it a bit. I've certainly not noticed ANY change in performance.

Installation should be fairly easy - like hombacher says, the O2 sensor screws into the exhaust, so make sure you wind the cable the opposite way first so the cable won't be twisted when it's secure. Other than that it's pretty simple - four bolts in the front, two per pipe, and then a few in the back where the tailpipe hooks onto the bike... and between the two, you're just gonna have to pull on some springs :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Welcome to the forums and congrats on the new bike and becoming a rider!

I just installed a new exhaust too, and had many of the same questions. The reason people say you need to remap the ECU is because the airflow through the new exhaust may be different from the old one, and thus the airflow through the engine will be as well. However, it seems like a lot of exhaust manufacturers keep this in mind when designing their pipes, and I also think the ECU compensates for it a bit. I've certainly not noticed ANY change in performance.

Installation should be fairly easy - like hombacher says, the O2 sensor screws into the exhaust, so make sure you wind the cable the opposite way first so the cable won't be twisted when it's secure. Other than that it's pretty simple - four bolts in the front, two per pipe, and then a few in the back where the tailpipe hooks onto the bike... and between the two, you're just gonna have to pull on some springs :)
Thanks man 🙇‍♂️ I’ll let y’all know when I get it installed fingers crossed i don’t wreck a new bike
 

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Welcome to the forums and congrats on the new bike and becoming a rider!
[..]
Installation should be fairly easy - like hombacher says, the O2 sensor screws into the exhaust, so make sure you wind the cable the opposite way first so the cable won't be twisted when it's secure. [..]
No, I wrote:

You, @JLee can bolt on and ready. Unplug the O2 sensor first and then unscrew it and the other way around when reinstalling. Only after the O2 sensor is plugged in again, fire up your bike. [..]
Maybe I missed to write unplug the O2 sensor cable first, my fault, but twisting the cable is no option.
 

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Welcome JLee. The Akra high mount is offered by Yamaha as an accessory, so it's a straight replacement for the OEM system. Don't worry about re-flashing the ECU for this pipe - if it ain't broke, don't try to fix it. Some cheaper straight through systems might burn out valves on the standard tune but not this one. There are a few members here who've regretted meddling with the ECU.
 

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No, I wrote:



Maybe I missed to write unplug the O2 sensor cable first, my fault, but twisting the cable is no option.
Twisting the "cable" wiring a bit simply makes electromechanical sense. Not a lot, but a couple twists of the sensor in the reverse direction that it will be turned when tightening will simply take a bit of the stress off of the wiring.

May not be a big deal, but it just made sense to me. Maybe overthinking, but if it takes maybe five full turns to put in the sensor it would seem to me that maybe three or four twists the opposite direction before threading in might keep the wiring a bit in line and unstressed coming out of the plug.

Thanks man 🙇‍♂️ I’ll let y’all know when I get it installed fingers crossed i don’t wreck a new bike
Did you take the time to contact the exhaust manufacturer? That would make it so you don't need to cross your fingers or "wreck a new bike". I never bothered asking anyone, but the manufacturer about requirements for their product. I figure they know best. I've done the same with tires too. When there is an expert available, why not ask the expert?
 

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Twisting the "cable" wiring a bit simply makes electromechanical sense. Not a lot, but a couple twists of the sensor in the reverse direction that it will be turned when tightening will simply take a bit of the stress off of the wiring.

May not be a big deal, but it just made sense to me. Maybe overthinking, but if it takes maybe five full turns to put in the sensor it would seem to me that maybe three or four twists the opposite direction before threading in might keep the wiring a bit in line and unstressed coming out of the plug.
[..]
Seriously? A discussion about unplugging the two cables and valuate if it is 3 and a half or even five twists of the cable, takes even longer than just unplug the cable.
it is the number of handy men who wrecked the sensor, by not unplugging and trying to screw the sensor in place again. Depending of the exhaust the hex spud is at different places. The cable mostly is tensioned like a guitar string already. so a proper working means here, unplug first, then unscrew.
 

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My selective reading took over. I see what you're saying - trace up the wiring to where it plugs in, unplug it before removing. Now I will say I didn't trace the wiring up to where it plugged in and probably should have. How about telling how much effort it will require to get to it?

My thought was avoiding unnecessarily twisting up the wiring just plain made electromechanical sense to me. Unscrewing it kind of wound up the wiring and after watching an installation where the same was done when screwing it in, it just plain made sense to me to avoid doing that if I could... The installation video on an exhaust install didn't show tracing the wire. I take it the connector is easy to get to, right?

I will say I didn't have to bother doing anything with the sensor, since I could simply screw it into the collector, rotating the collector to have no twisting force on the wiring before sliding the collector onto the head pipes when installing the exhaust system.

So that pretty much sums up my reasoning on it and what I did to avoid winding up the wiring like spaghetti on a fork. But I guess I should have found where it plugged in and unplugged it at the connector - right?

And why not discuss it? Not any more useless than some stuff done like pulling the wheel to slide the fork down to put some black covers on the fork tubes to black them out.
 
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