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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The question is, what do you want to achieve?
a not so loafy front end. more sports orientated. i have purchased the clubman bars from the abarth and plan to get rearsets and the yss shock. id like to make the bike into something similar to the 900 abarth
 

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I am 6'0" and 200lb. (very close to your specs.)
I did 15W and took 15mm off my spacers.
I think it's a nice improvement.
I have 40mm rider sag, within the recommended range.
 

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a not so loafy front end. more sports orientated. i have purchased the clubman bars from the abarth and plan to get rearsets and the yss shock. id like to make the bike into something similar to the 900 abarth

The front end is more than just okay. The bad one is the rear. Any upgrade there will bring the forks in proper operation. Do not cut, do not change the damping or rebound behaviour by the oil. Ride first with the upgrade you are planning.

If this will not fit to your riding style, then the forks upgrade is more than cutting or oil changing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am 6'0" and 200lb. (very close to your specs.)
I did 15W and took 15mm off my spacers.
I think it's a nice improvement.
I have 40mm rider sag, within the recommended range.
15mm off?! You think I should take that off too? That seems alot from the reccomended 10mm
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The front end is more than just okay. The bad one is the rear. Any upgrade there will bring the forks in proper operation. Do not cut, do not change the damping or rebound behaviour by the oil. Ride first with the upgrade you are planing.

If this will not fit to your riding style, then the forks upgrade is more than cutting or oil changing!
How come you don't reccomend it? The front forks are awful
 

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15mm off?! You think I should take that off too? That seems alot from the reccomended 10mm
I bought some adjustable caps, so I could fine tune.
To get the rider sag I wanted, I left the adjusters all the way out, like they weren't there.
So basically, I have 15mm off my spacers.
 

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How come you don't reccomend it? The front forks are awful
No the rear is awful. You should feel it if you ride a little spirited. It is the rear which either loses the contact to the ground or bounces additionally, without proper damping. As said, first the rear and then thinking about the forks. A little thicker oil will only make your forks slow. Cutting down the spacers will only result in cutted down spacers. Quite useless.
 

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This video has gotten everybody thinking this way.
And the forks seem "bouncy" from the first ride anyone takes on an XSR.
 

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Is there a name for people without a clue and running around in shorts in a video? Maybe 'he has shortcomings everywhere'?
 

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The way this guy talks, the rear shock is "OK" for 4-5k miles.
Then it belongs in the trash bin.
My bike has 2k miles, so I put "new shock" on next years list.
 

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I wouldn't follow him off a cliff, but actually checking that you have somewhat balanced rider sag, is motorcycle 101.
I've been hearing that for 20+ years.
Many people don't even start there.
 

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I started by replacing my rear sock with a wilbers tailored for my height and riding needs. I felt the difference after the swap. I still think the front is not dampening enough. It is too bouncy and fast.

My bike was 15.000 km and is 3 year old. I have to replace the fork oil and will try Motul Expert fork oil medium/heavy 15W and check what it feels. Fork oil is relatively inexpensive and dont mind experimenting a bit.
Not all 15w fork oil is the same. From my research Motul and Bel-Ray seems to make one of the thickest. Google some cSt tables for comparison.

I'm not cutting spacer. I dont really understand how that will correct what Dave Moss complains about - the bounciness. I'm no mechanic, but in my mind it seems cutting the spacer will only drop the front end and increase raiders sag?! Would appreciate be educated on this from the more experienced in this forum.

I'm 1,82m tall and 82kg without gear for reference.
 

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The way this guy talks, the rear shock is "OK" for 4-5k miles.
Then it belongs in the trash bin.
My bike has 2k miles, so I put "new shock" on next years list.
:) one of the nonsense he is talking about. Either a shock is bad and does not work, or it will be typically worn and ready for service after 20 tkm or 12500 mi. Most OEM shocks are even used much longer without any minding of the rider.
 

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[..]
I'm not cutting spacer. I dont really understand how that will correct what Dave Moss complains about - the bounciness. I'm no mechanic, but in my mind it seems cutting the spacer will only drop the front end and increase raiders sag?! [..]
I doubt he knows even better. He just babbles. The MT/XSR forks are simple, only two tubes telescoping, a spring to keep a loaded height and some oil to control the telescoping speed. Typical built for decades. In my early motorcycle years, the availability in upgrade parts was low. Even a pair of heavier springs was not available for the current ride. So we fudged around with thicker oil or insane spacer lengths. This is more than 30 years ago, and that is where you find Dave.
What he does not get is, that MT/XSR is quite lightweight, short wheelbase and a very direct linkage of the rear shock. He is talking about the front forks and does not feel how the fast coming up rear makes the front head in. The rear shock has a poor rebound damping and does not work when riding more spirited.

OEM springs of MT/XSR are okay for 75 to 85 kg riders. So most costumers should have a more or less suitable riding sag. For the video lightweight girl it is nonsense to cut off the spacers, as it does not reduce the preload nor increase the sag. There are just too heavy springs installed.
This is in line when lightweight riders also report about feeling like a pogo stick in the saddle. Rear spring too heavy, poor damping to reduce the rebouncing speed.

So a proper approach will be, first the rear shock according your dimensions and riding style. Then upgrade the forks if needed. Heavier oil makes the forks slow in regard telescoping in and out. This is normally not the desired effect. OEM springs are linear wound, so you may get some progression by reducing the air volume or increasing the oil level.
Any other wish or demand to your forks can only be fulfilled by upgrading towards a variable compression and rebound damping. A solution with a little Dave video, heavier oil is just wishful thinking.
 

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It's incredible how much damage that video has done to novices that understand nothing about suspension :oops:
Just because somebody is setting up an old MT-07 (with maybe very different springs) for a very light rider, it doesn't mean that is a universal solution for everybody.
Setting up suspension is a precise science, not just copy-cat a non relevant set up!

As @hombacher said: look at what you want to achieve and what are your current shortcomings/problems, then you can start to look at solutions.
For me (heavy and aggressive rider) was the opposite of what the video suggests: I needed more pre-load (longer spacer) as the front fork was half-way compressed just by sitting on my bike. The correct way to go is a heavier spring but I am cheap so I just compressed the OEM springs. I changed the rear shock to one that has ample dampening (no more bouncing) and heavier spring (no more bottom out). The forks then had the oil changed to 23W.
While not perfect the bike is now good enough for my style of riding (preference for dirt roads).
 

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I'm so glad to see some pushback on this topic by @hombacher and @gnarlydog.

I see too many fellow motorcyclists (more often than not motorcyclists who've only been riding for a couple of months) find the video by Dave Moss and blindly copy & pasting the suggestions he offers to their motorcycles.

Look, Dave is a knowledgeable dude, but in the very popular videos he's made about the FZ-07 / MT-07 front forks he's massively glossing over the fact that motorcycle suspension is hugely dependant on the rider (his/her dimensions and riding style) and the type of riding someone is doing.

As @gnarlydog said, setting up motorcycle suspension is a science. If, for whatever reason, you feel your motorcycle's suspension could use work and you don't have any experience in setting up motorcycle suspension and are not being mentored by someone who does, or you have only been riding motorcycles for a couple of months; Contact your local Yamaha dealer and/or local suspension workshop.

Improperly setting up your motorcycle's suspension could get you hurt, or worst case, killed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
so you all suggest i should just put thicker oil in? as far as i was aware cutting the spacer reduces static sag. im 92-95kg depending what i wear. im going to get a yss rear shock as me plus a pillion is just awful riding and im on the stiffest setting.

can someone suggest (something that doesnt cost me an arm and a leg for a 4500gbp bike) a solution for the front fork.
 
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