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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I find myself on occasions needing more fuel than what the gas tank can offer. Here in Australia once I go away from the main highways and start to explore country roads the service stations are not that frequent. I need to carry more than the 14 liters to be able to explore remote locations. I looked at my options and somebody suggested a fuel bladder that I can strap on top of the tank or on the back of the seat.
Thing is I like to camp and space starts to become a premium once I have my camping gear all loaded.
So far the best solution for me has been a solid fuel canister (jerry can) designed to be mounted on the frame or rack of a motorcycle.
I opted for 3 liter version, but a 5 liter one could be considered, once I start to go further afield.
Here shown mounted on the rear, when using a single seat (but double would work too).

jerry can 3L by gnarlydog, on Flickr

The "U" bolts for the carrier are perfectly sized for the diameter of the sub-frame and the canister clears the square shaped "bulb" up front.

jerry can 3L_2 by gnarlydog, on Flickr

Here is what it looks like with canister removed: I can live with that.

jerry can 3L_4 by gnarlydog, on Flickr

Rear view

jerry can 3L_3 by gnarlydog, on Flickr

Does anybody else carry additional fuel on their XSR700? I would be interested to see your solution
 

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've seen those advertised before and I know they are a bit pricey but if it gets the job done then that's all that matters. I've been planning a trip to Alaska for several years and I've been worried about getting in remote places where gas can be hard to come by. I guess 3 litres is far better than running out. On this bike it's really hard to add much without going to all out large racks and carrying containers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The alternative for me was a fuel bladder which would sit somewhere on top of the tank (?) or somewhere on the seat.
I need the rear of the seat for camping gear as I am not keen on adding racks to an otherwise good looking bike. At US$ 27 I thought it would not break the bank and for a few $ more I can get the 5 liter one.
Once I remove the canister I am left with an acceptable small-ish black plastic "cone" mount. I wish it would be totally flush or something.
There is a 2.5 liter from Givi (https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/givi-tan01-outback-jerry-can) but not sure how to mount it. Then again the Givi one being smaller it could go up front, over the ECU cover area.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
After a couple of trips with the red fuel canister I realized that maybe it's overkill, not in concept but design.
Admittedly the canister is super sturdy and probably will survive a crash and maybe even a slide (very thick plastic) but all the indentations and the mounting systems make it a bulky item for just 3 Lt.
I ordered the Givi Tan01 and I was worried about mounting. It turns out it's stupid easy: up front, just above the frame slider

Givi Tan01_3 by gnarlydog, on Flickr

I used a "Arno" style strap to go around the frame tubes and the metal buckle allows me to cinch it down (actually a bit too much, I noticed).
Between canister and bike I put some closed cell foam to prevent rubbing. The can is mounted solidly and no movement or sliding.

Givi Tan01_1 by gnarlydog, on Flickr

The Givi has the consistency of an oil container: not very thick but since it's homologated I assume it should be OK.
This one is much less obtrusive and just 1/2 liter less than the other one. I could mount a second one on the left side of the engine as well but I don't think I need that much extra fuel at the moment.
 

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Gnarlydog, thanks for the photos of the Givi Tan01 they were very much appreciated, just what I have been looking for at a very good price of £14 in the UK. I ordered one within minutes of seeing your post ! Regards, Onslowe
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After a weekend ride (two days) in temps from 10C to 26C I noticed:

1) the canisters stays in position and there is no rattling/wobbles

2) there is significant expansion/contraction depending on temperature. In the morning the can looked like "sucked-in" a bit, while in the afternoon in the sun it looked ballooned out. The red canister did not show that as much since it's much sturdier.

3) I need to carry the spout for pouring somewhere else since it don't fit inside the can Givi like it did on the red one. It a bit bulky and I will to find a lighter/smaller solution, possibly fabricate/adapt something else.
 

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I saw a guy on you tube had a litre fuel can, looked like drink bottle and a plastics container to put it in and mount it. I will try to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I saw a guy on you tube had a litre fuel can, looked like drink bottle and a plastics container to put it in and mount it. I will try to find it.
Sure, I have seen people using empty Coke bottles to carry extra fuel but I think it's more an emergency than something permanent. Often you hear of that on expeditions, that require some section to have extra fuel, where the rider doesn't want to have always such containers with him, and simply discards them once he no longer needs them.
One other solution (a bit more elegant and sturdy) is to use metal drink bottles. https://tinyurl.com/y3ys3gx2

They come in up to 2 liters and can be mounted on the frame by creating some kind of cradle or support. I considered that but I thought a square container will carry more fuel and would be easier to mount.
 

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