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Yamaha XSR, 2019.
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, sorry if this topic is covered elsewhere.

I live in a Australia and I am still not on my full license, so I got the what we call here "LAMS" version of XSR700 - or learners. Still 650CC and about 73.8 hp.

Now, I've read somewhere that these are actually not delivering all 73.8 as they're restricted for new riders.

So, was wondering, if anyone have any experience with derestricting it and is it worthed.

Thanks
 

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Your LAMS version is restricted by a cylinder sleeve to 655cc (and presumably by a retuned ECU as well?) to give about 50bhp max power. It won't make ever make 74bhp! There are quite a few Aussie riders here on the forum - I suspect their general concensus would be - "It's fine, leave well alone and enjoy it".
 

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Part of the equation is a 2 mm less bore (78 vs. 80) and that's not easily changed obviously but according to what I've seen there is also a limit in the throttle that also attributes an aspect of the roughly 20 h.p. less rating. If I lived in AZ I'd go to my dealer and find out the different part numbers in the intake tract between the two models and see if the cost to convert was worth the price. I suspect it could be done easily enough but the price may be pretty steep and the bore difference is something you'll just have to live with.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks all. What prompt me this question is the following video:
 

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While it's a headache to legally de-restrict the LAMS version of the XSR (needs to be inspected and re-registered) many do it illegally.
Bear in mind that you are on a non open license and any accident you ought to have, no insurance will pay and you will be fully liable. o_O
Now we have covered the legal reason not to do it, let's have a look at the things one has to do to bring the bike to almost full power.

The easiest and cheapest mod it to get a throttle plate that allows fully open (and not limited to about 6000rpm).
The other bits that are a bit harder and costly is the intake from the air box. There is a restriction on the bore that prevents full air flow. One has to Dremel it out (or cut it with an utility knife) and increase the bore. A bit messy and gotta make sure rubber doesn't end up in engine.
Now comes the expensive part: tune the ECU to accommodate for the higher airflow.
I hear that most people pay about AU$ 500-800+ just for that.

Honestly, the bike produces plenty of power for spirited riding on Australian roads. May I point out that the speed limit is 110Km/h max :cautious:
Unless you are addicted to track riding where power is indeed a crucial part of the fun, I would say that desiring a faster bike only leads to the strong chance to lose your license. Don't ask me how I know that... :cry:

A pissing contest against liter bikes often just ends up in tears, when the blue lights appear behind you.
Last but not least: on a twisty road the XSR in capable of keeping up with the big bikes, and that is where the fun lays, not a straight road drag.
If your skills are such that you find scraping the pegs on most corners then maybe indeed you could consider a faster bike, when the time comes at getting your full license.
 

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Thanks all. What prompt me this question is the following video:
While it's a headache to legally de-restrict the LAMS version of the XSR (needs to be inspected and re-registered) many do it illegally.
Bear in mind that you are on a non open license and any accident you ought to have, no insurance will pay and you will be fully liable. o_O
Now we have covered the legal reason not to do it, let's have a look at the things one has to do to bring the bike to almost full power.

The easiest and cheapest mod it to get a throttle plate that allows fully open (and not limited to about 6000rpm).
The other bits that are a bit harder and costly is the intake from the air box. There is a restriction on the bore that prevents full air flow. One has to Dremel it out (or cut it with an utility knife) and increase the bore. A bit messy and gotta make sure rubber doesn't end up in engine.
Now comes the expensive part: tune the ECU to accommodate for the higher airflow.
I hear that most people pay about AU$ 500-800+ just for that.

Honestly, the bike produces plenty of power for spirited riding on Australian roads. May I point out that the speed limit is 110Km/h max :cautious:
Unless you are addicted to track riding where power is indeed a crucial part of the fun, I would say that desiring a faster bike only leads to the strong chance to lose your license. Don't ask me how I know that... :cry:

A pissing contest against liter bikes often just ends up in tears, when the blue lights appear behind you.
Last but not least: on a twisty road the XSR in capable of keeping up with the big bikes, and that is where the fun lays, not a straight road drag.
If your skills are such that you find scraping the pegs on most corners then maybe indeed you could consider a faster bike, when the time comes at getting your full license.
I agree 1200%. My 2019 Moto Guzzi V7III has taken me all over the place (long distance) where the XSR would probably get a bit tiring and the Guzzi only makes 52 horses but it'll still top the one ton mark and it never seems to be underpowered unless a person was in a drag race and that's certainly out of it's realm. People get too enamored with horsepower and speed, especially where and when it legally can't be used. Might as well enjoy the bike for it's intended purpose and be happy and have enough cash to afford to buy gas and rider clothing to keep you safe.
 

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If I had the bike I'd do the throttle de-limiter stuff and that's it. I'd have taken this bike in a 500. It is more about the actual bike than the top speed and horsepower. It was what I wanted. I agree that the fun part is riding where the sheer horsepower doesn't make it. The tighter the turns the more fun it is. Straights are boring.
 

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Thanks gnarlydog and everyone else for your perspective. It certainly bring some valid points up.
Hey GJuko, I was the same initially...felt shortchanged and wanted my extra HP.
Like the others have said, this bike is plenty fast and very torquey.
You may find the money is better spent fixing the suspension, but each to their own.
 
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