XSR 700 Forums banner
21 - 26 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
Opinions not facts. Don’t be a Karen, just enjoy your bike and let others enjoy theirs. Your preference and reasons are yours. It’s a motorcycle, it’s dangerous. Bar end mirrors aren’t unsafe, they are a different choice. This discussion went from advantage and disadvantages of a part. To a bunch of preaching and do as I say or you are wrong drivel. And that is sad, not to mention boring, like oem mirrors.
Let me make it less boring for you. You said the mirrors are too heavy(whatever that means) and in the way, and you can't see out of them. I am calling you out that you didn't know how to adjust them. Everyone here obviously has the right to mod their bike however they choose. I just smh when people give 100% incorrect reasons why something doesn't work properly. Rode for 70 miles today, oem mirrors 100% covered sides and behind me. Again, not finding fault in your reasoning, I'm finding fault in that you failed to adjust the oem mirrors properly and then blamed the mirrors. And then spread false reasoning that some people are actually going to believe and spread as fact. Name call me all you want. Boring, sad, drivel, Karen. If one kid today read this and adjusted the mirrors correctly and went, holy shoot these are actually nice, I'm gonna get better at riding with these, then I'm happy I engaged with you on this. It's a forum about a particular bike and if I see crappy explanations about the bikes' parts, then I want to call them out. I explained in detail above the strategy to get the mirrors adjusted for perfect use. I didn't just attack your reasons, but explained how to use the mirrors properly. And last, I never said bar end mirrors are unsafe , I mean they are a safety device aren't they, just not as safe as oem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
:ROFLMAO: Show some pictures of your bikes with bar end mirrors. Let’s see what you tried before you switched back to stock. And That’s a long read, Way to heavy man, like the stock mirrors.

Can’t wait to see the bar end mirrors you guys tried on your bikes to arrive at such an entrenched conclusion.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
773 Posts
Hmmm.....this thread is drifting into a bit of a war of words and mud-slinging commentary - the kind of thing that puts me off some other forums. Keep the comments respectful please - remember we're all on the same side here!

For what it's worth, here's my take on bar end mirrors....
These are almost always fitted for cosmetic reasons. They neaten up the front end of the bike by removing the unsightly appendages of the stock mirrors. But, in most cases, (though clearly not all), they don't offer quite such a clear view of the road behind. Adequate perhaps, but generally not as good. And they do make the bike a bit wider. So we sacrifice a bit of function over form, not a big deal if we still have a reasonable rear view.

Humans would undoubtedly be prettier without ears stuck on the side of their heads but.....

PS An afterthought...
I remember riding an old R1100RT many years ago, with stock mirrors located way down in the fairing. They took a bit of getting used to but worked a treat, giving a great view of the road behind. So, I guess it's whatever works for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I didn’t know that having a different experience was grounds for being branded a dangerous, idiot that races on the streets and doesn’t know how to adjust a mirror. That was a lot of assumptions and drama based on my preferences. You would think the discussion was politics or worse, tires and oil.

Here are some non assumptions.

What works for one doesn’t necessarily work for others. I’m not a small person, in North American units, I’m 6’1 without shoes, and 230lbs naked. Not fat, I’m very athletic, 33 waist, wide shoulders. Out of the 3 bikes currently own, I can’t see out of the XSR stock mirrors to my satisfaction. So I changed them. Crazy I know. Years in engineering school wasted. The horror.:ROFLMAO:

Now as far as simply adjusting them, no dice. Mind you, I could have simply bolted the OEMs or any other mirror back on if the improvements or tradeoffs weren’t there. The ones from the tenere 700 were quite good actually, but the rod arm was to long and didn’t look good on the bike. I tried some cruiser mirrors and way to tall.

Off they came. On the bar end mirrors went and tada! On this bike, I can actually see behind me, very useful when going into Mexico. I can actually see what people behind me are doing as I sit in traffic, not to the sides, behind me. The mirrors don’t normally hit because program compliance is a thing and these sit under the bar. And they weighed next to nothing! Which was a huge bonus, as this was another goal for this bike.

Side quest! By taking off items of unnecessary weight I’ve managed to shave a surprisingly large amount of said unnecessary kilos off the bike, it now feels, well, lighter and a heck of a lot more fun going around the non stop canyons and roads out here in the South west and It’s a hoot to ride in the city. The mirrors, pillion pegs and exhaust were the worst offenders. The most surprisingly heavy and I wouldn’t have thought to check were the mirrors. Next was the exhaust, wow what a chunker. Slightly off topic but my wanting a lighter bike did keep coming up so there it is.

Still waiting to see people’s pictures with bar end mirrors they “actually tried” and didn’t like or found so scary and dangerous, they decided to go back to OEM before embarking on a crusade to save all the newly minted squidies of the world… For they alone had the wisdom…Of the mirror. :ROFLMAO: :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
What work, works. No battles to win. Heck, I'm one of few (if any ) running a full length long exhaust, using rises, filled rear fender with an old school tail light. Posted some stuff, likely rejected. Don't really care, maybe benefit someone some day, who knows. A heck of a lot here are on board with your mirror thoughts. Just because they haven't spoken up doen't lessen the number of posts and pictures here. You have peers that followed a similar lead and are happy with their choice, as are you. Let it slide, let it slide. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
I know, from what I've seen on this forum and others that I have been a member of over the past couple of years that Bar-end mirrors seem to be in vogue. OEM mirrors are in place because they are in line, or pretty close to in line with the direction of travel and where we need to be looking in order to avoid the obstacles that may be in our path. The mirrors on both my bikes and most I've ever owned place the mirrors about 4 to 5 inches above each hand. Not directly in my eye view, but pretty close so I only need to move my eyes slightly to go from straight ahead vision to rear view vision, probably a tenth or two of a second. With a Bar-end mirror, the eye movement is quite a bit increased to change focus from straight ahead to rear view. The mirror is now lower and further to the outside and if the mirror is turned down like I see some, it's another four or so inches lower requiring increased eye movement and refocusing. At 70 M.P.H. you are traveling about 102 ft. per second. We have to be aware that a simple check of the review mirror is a loss of attention to the direction we are headed and the further the mirror is from straight ahead, the further we are moving forward without seeing what's right in front of us. Now, we have to ask ourselves, "can I afford that loss or am I good enough to compensate and still be safe? Just an important question.
I generally agree with your observations. Taking the attention away from the riding direction ahead at a certain speed, lets you travel a lot, sure.
I as well agree that bar-end mirrors are en vogue. Even some manufacturers sell their roadster or classic models with bar-end mirrors from stock. Nice to see and look back in history what was already mounted there at the bar-end. You find there those mirrors, turnsignals or even the handlevers for clutch or brake were attached there.

What I dislike at our XSR is the high-volume product of integrated threads for the mirrors in the clutch or brake clamp. Adjusting up and down the levers left and right will cause a final position of the mirrors. Aesthetes will see the different positions of the mirrors when they see their bike. It looks quite messed once you have seen it. But it comes worse:
Lucky you, if this high-volume position of the mirrors fits you. There is a broad offering of a variety of adapters and extensions for OEM mirrors, because a lot of people only see their arms or shoulders.

Brings me to my story in which I stood at some traffic lights, beside me an elder Triumph. And hey, there were those bar-end mirrors fitted. Comparing with my XSR, those plastic seashells here, those nicely elaborated shiny metal parts there. I was quite sure, what works since the mid of the sixties can not be that bad today. Usually the OEM mirrors suit me and over the years and bikes, I never swapped the mirrors or blinkers.
Anyhow in that traffic light moment I was fascinated by the style of the Triumph. Sure, some bar-end mirrors on a XSR will never make it look classic...

But I found a nice pair and have to admit, I love them:

Tire Wheel Vehicle Fuel tank Automotive lighting


Jepp, the XSR is wider now. But the effect is, that I can see the space behind me much better. This is just needed when I am the tour guide to find my group members. And I can do it in a blink of an eye without moving my head.
But in traffic, please dear readers, try to remember what has to be done before changing the lanes or doing an other manoeuvre?

Right, it is the shoulder check. And this shoulder check is not limited by the bar-end mirrors.

And jepp, removing the OEM mirrors and the OEM front end saves a lot of kilograms...
 
21 - 26 of 26 Posts
Top